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Which format for Timeline?
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8GeneL3 [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Aug 04, 2021 12:07 Messages: 46 Offline
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Original attempt at editing resulted in failure due to my use of pds format on the timeline. Which I did not know at that time being new to this editing business.

My only input source file is avi format. After some editing on the timeline, I closed the file by clicking on the X in upper right corner of edit work area. At that point the system put me back on Windows File Explorer page. At bottom of that page I put in the name for the file and designated avi as the file format.

But what surprised me was the notation "pds" appearing directly under the file name line. After my first time experience above, what gives with this pds business? Its a code for system processing isn't it?
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Philwild [Avatar]
Senior Member Private Message Location: Hemel Hempstead, UK Joined: Oct 05, 2017 12:04 Messages: 205 Offline
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Programs like PowerDirector are non-destructive, that is they don't change your original clips.

In order to do this PowerDirector uses a pds file. This file records all your changes as well as the location of the original clips.

So, as soon as you save a new project a pds file will be created in the location you specify.

When you then produce (to avi or whatever) this then creates your finished video.

The advantage of this is you can use your clips again in other projects, or you can go back to the first project and change the edits and produce again for a different look.

Hope this helps.

Phil
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PowerDirector Moderator [Avatar]
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: New Taipei City, Taiwan Joined: Oct 18, 2016 00:25 Messages: 1299 Offline
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Quote Original attempt at editing resulted in failure due to my use of pds format on the timeline. Which I did not know at that time being new to this editing business.

My only input source file is avi format. After some editing on the timeline, I closed the file by clicking on the X in upper right corner of edit work area. At that point the system put me back on Windows File Explorer page. At bottom of that page I put in the name for the file and designated avi as the file format.

But what surprised me was the notation "pds" appearing directly under the file name line. After my first time experience above, what gives with this pds business? Its a code for system processing isn't it?


Hi,

As Phil has indicated, after your editing session has finished, you need to save your project file. This is completely different to producing your finished video production.

Your project file has to have the .pds file type. It is the only valid option for PowerDirector to work with. No other application can open or work with a PowerDirector project file.

I can only urge you to study the PM's of Oct 05, Oct 06, and Oct 07 that we exchanged regarding some of your initial editing problems in this topic
https://forum.cyberlink.com/forum/posts/list/85876.page#post_box_355483

in which I outlined the principles and file types involved in saving project files and producing your final video.

I do think you are still under a misunderstanding of the fundamental workflow and file management processes that are necessary to edit and produce a final video.

In my Oct 07 PM I offered to produce a short tutorial to try and help your understanding of these principles but you felt it not necessary at that time. If you have changed your mind, please send me a PM and we can see what can be done to get you up and running properly.

PowerDirector Moderator
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8GeneL3 [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Aug 04, 2021 12:07 Messages: 46 Offline
[Post New]
Quote Programs like PowerDirector are non-destructive, that is they don't change your original clips.

In order to do this PowerDirector uses a pds file. This file records all your changes as well as the location of the original clips.

So, as soon as you save a new project a pds file will be created in the location you specify.

When you then produce (to avi or whatever) this then creates your finished video.

The advantage of this is you can use your clips again in other projects, or you can go back to the first project and change the edits and produce again for a different look.

Hope this helps.

Phil


Phil, thank you for your comments. I'm getting an education on pds.
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