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Making a green screen.
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Hi, say you just masked something using the adjustment mask and it lasts for 30 keyframes. Do you have to make the green scteen for each keyframe?
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optodata
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: California, USA Joined: Sep 16, 2011 16:04 Messages: 3566 Online
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Quote Hi, say you just masked something using the adjustment mask and it lasts for 30 keyframes. Do you have to make the green scteen for each keyframe?

I'm not quite sure how to answer that, because it sounds like you're asking about working with a green screen kind of backwards.

What I mean is that you'd typically record a scene with the person or object in front of a green screen, which is then chroma-keyed out so a completely differernt background can be added in the finished photo or video. You normally wouldn't create a green screen by masking a timeline object.

If you've created a mask, you can already place that object directly on top of another background without doing anything else. There's no need for a green screen.

If you're asking whether the mask needs to be applied to all 30 frames, the answer is a mask will last as long as you have it applied, but if the subject is moving then you'd need to adjust the mask in each keyframe to match.

Does this explanation help?
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Quote

I'm not quite sure how to answer that, because it sounds like you're asking about working with a green screen kind of backwards.

What I mean is that you'd typically record a scene with the person or object in front of a green screen, which is then chroma-keyed out so a completely differernt background can be added in the finished photo or video. You normally wouldn't create a green screen by masking a timeline object.

If you've created a mask, you can already place that object directly on top of another background without doing anything else. There's no need for a green screen.

If you're asking whether the mask needs to be applied to all 30 frames, the answer is a mask will last as long as you have it applied, but if the subject is moving then you'd need to adjust the mask in each keyframe to match.

Does this explanation help?


I don't have an actual green screen. I want to try masking an object, removing the background and adding another background in PD. In order to do that I believe I have to make something similar to a green screen in CD.
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Yes, you are right. Have a look:



Hatti Win 10 64, i7-4790k, 32GB Ram, 256 GB SSD, SATA 2TB, SATA 4TB, NVidia GTX1080 8GB, LG 34" 4K Wide, AOC 24" 1080
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Quote Yes, you are right. Have a look:



Hatti


Awesome thanks
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Hi Mouhamad, that's a really great video from Hatti.
I wanted to find out if it's easy to produce a greenscreen in post a few years ago after watching Star Wars Rebellion by hitfilm. It was made with earlier version of software but the principle is the same. Where as Hatti skillfully uses the tracking function, mine is static. It's just a variation on the same theme. Here is my video which may be of some use to you.

Kind Regards I just want to edit. All this stuff with wires and magic is getting me down !!
Win 10 64-bit, Intel(R)Core(TM) i5-2400 CPU @ 3.40 GHz with Turbo Boost + 8GB Ram (could really do with more)
USB 3, 4TB external hard drive. Nvidia GT 640 GFX card
All work
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