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Image Stabilizer Bounces VHS Date/Time Stamp - Why?
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garioch7
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: Port Hood, Nova Scotia, Canada Joined: Feb 07, 2011 06:45 Messages: 851 Offline
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I have a client who should have taken videography lessons before committing his video memories to VHS tape, and should have used SP instead of EP (SLP). I am in the process of converting his VHS to DVD (mpeg2). If I apply image stabilization, which his video desperately needs, the date/time stamp that he was so fond of using, starts bouncing around.

Is there a solution to this issue? If not, would someone be so kind as to give me an explanation as to why this occurs, so that I can explain to the client that image stabilization is not an option?

I don't think that this is a PD10 problem - I am guessing that the VHS/camcorder date/time stamp is some type of an overlay on one of the VHS tracks and that when PD10 tries to image stabilize, it can't get a hold on the date/time stamp to keep it in place.

Any and all explanations will be gratefully received. Have a great day, and thanks for your anticipated sharing of your expertise.

Regards,
-Phil Windows 10 Pro x64
Dell XPS 8930
Intel CoreT i7 (4.6 GHz)
32 GB DDR4-2666 RAM
1 TB PCIe -x4 SSD
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060
PD14 Ultimate x64, 4207
CD4 Ultra and AD6 Ultra
Bleeping Computer Malware Response Instructor
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JL_JL [Avatar]
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: Arizona, USA Joined: Oct 01, 2006 20:01 Messages: 4403 Offline
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Pretty basic, digital image stabilization technique shifts the electronic image from frame to frame of the video, essentially enough shift to counteract the small motion in the video (hand shake). It uses pixels outside the typical view border of the visible frame to provide a buffer for this counteract motion. This technique can reduce distracting vibrations from videos. However, since the date/time stamp is in a "fixed" pixel area of the image it never needs adjusting, it is not moving on any frame. What you are seeing is the counteract motion that needed to be applied to the entire digital image to correct the video image, this will cause the "fixed" pixel area of the date/time stamp to now bounce.

Jeff
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BarryTheCrab
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: USA Joined: Nov 06, 2008 22:18 Messages: 6045 Offline
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The only solution is to blur/mask the time-stamp to a tolerable result, or crop the video to eliminate the time-stamp altogether. Either solution has it's drawbacks. HP Envy Phoenix/4thGen i7-4770(4@3.4GHz~turbo>3.9)/Nvidia GTX 960(4GB)/16GB DDR3/7,200rpm/w10x64---
Canon Vixia HV30/HF-M40/HF-M41/HF-G20/Olympus E-PL5. Analog tape capture equipment.
https://www.facebook.com/B-Gill-Cyber-Studio-609762572849441
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garioch7
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: Port Hood, Nova Scotia, Canada Joined: Feb 07, 2011 06:45 Messages: 851 Offline
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Thanks for the explanation. I guess the client, and I, will have to live with it. I was suspicious that the date/time stamp was "fixed".

Thanks again, Jeff and Barry, and have a great day.

Regards,
-Phil Windows 10 Pro x64
Dell XPS 8930
Intel CoreT i7 (4.6 GHz)
32 GB DDR4-2666 RAM
1 TB PCIe -x4 SSD
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060
PD14 Ultimate x64, 4207
CD4 Ultra and AD6 Ultra
Bleeping Computer Malware Response Instructor
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