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transfering mini DV tape movies from Firewire 400 to New computer with USB 3.1 and Thunderbolt ports
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lawrenceqsherry [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Oct 28, 2018 21:47 Messages: 3 Offline
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Software I use: Media Suite 10

I have a Canon HV20 camcorder with uses Firewire 400 to transfer movies to a computer (a Dell i7 Gen 8 using Windows 10). My problem is that new laptops like mine do not have the now defunct Firewire ports and new laptops no longer have PC slots for PC cards. I need a way to transfer my tapes to my computer.

My computer has USB 3.1 ports and a Thunderbolt 3 port.

So far the only solution I have found (that was designed designed for use on MACs) is to purchase three separate adapters and daisy chain them together. First I need a Thunderbolt 2 to Firewire 800 adapter. Then I need an adapter that converts Thunderbolt 2 to Thunderbolt 3. Finally I need a firewire 800 to 400 adapter. This will cost $88 and may not work on a Windows Computer (all of the adapters are made by Apple.

Pinnacle used to make a Moviebox which had a firewire input and a USB 2 output but I'm not sure if I would lose video quality.

If anyone knows of a solution I'd appreciate your assistance.

Lawrence Sherry
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optodata
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: California, USA Joined: Sep 16, 2011 16:04 Messages: 2159 Online
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I assume there are still videos on the device that you'd like to access. If not, I think you'd be much better off by buying any new or used camera from the past couple of years and get the benefits of vastly more detailed video along with fully compatible connectivity. Even a couple hundred dollars would get you 1080/60p, and maybe even 2k/4k.

Otherwise, the two best ways I can see are to buy a simple USB-based video capture module (as low as $25 or so) and use PowerDirector's built-in Capture room to "record" the video from your camera onto your laptop's hard drive.

Another option would be to find a cheap miniDV camcorder with a USB port on Ebay, and plop your media in and make the transfer that way.
youtube/optodata

Director Suite 365 | Win10 Pro | Core i7-4770K (o'ck to 4.3GHz) | GTX 780Ti | nVidia 411.70 | ASUS Z87 DX/QUAD | 5.4TB SSDs | 23TB HDDs | 32GB RAM | (12GB RAMDrive)
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lawrenceqsherry [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Oct 28, 2018 21:47 Messages: 3 Offline
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Quote I assume there are still videos on the device that you'd like to access. If not, I think you'd be much better off by buying any new or used camera from the past couple of years and get the benefits of vastly more detailed video along with fully compatible connectivity. Even a couple hundred dollars would get you 1080/60p, and maybe even 2k/4k.

Otherwise, the two best ways I can see are to buy a simple USB-based video capture module (as low as $25 or so) and use PowerDirector's built-in Capture room to "record" the video from your camera onto your laptop's hard drive.

Another option would be to find a cheap miniDV camcorder with a USB port on Ebay, and plop your media in and make the transfer that way.


I want to transfer movies so that I can edit them.

I'm don't understand how a USB video capture module would help unless it had a firewire input. The only device I saw like that was made by Pinnacle (it is now discontinued) and a used one sells for over $200 dollars.



Surprisingly it is very hard to find a recent HD camera that used mini DV tapes and a USB video output. The manufacturing date of my camera is 2010. Firewire 400 was still the way to go then. They even came out with firewire 800. Once you get a little newer you are on to different media than mini DV tapes. Firewire 400 was used because it is faster than USB 2. At that time most computers had USB 2 even though USB 3.0 came out before I bought my camera. Since most computer hardware doesn not require speeds as fast as Firewire (mice, keyboards, etc) It became the popular transfer device, Firewire died.

I'll have to keep looking for a solution that is inexpensive. It's not like it was when I was "filming" my kids, or later their weddings . I no longer need a newer camcorder.

Thank you for trying to help. I really appreciate it.
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optodata
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: California, USA Joined: Sep 16, 2011 16:04 Messages: 2159 Online
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Quote I want to transfer movies so that I can edit them.

I'm don't understand how a USB video capture module would help unless it had a firewire input. The only device I saw like that was made by Pinnacle (it is now discontinued) and a used one sells for over $200 dollars.

A USB capture device will connect to your camcorder's video out signal, like it was a TV. It will then convert the analog TV signal to a digital format that's saved on your laptop.

The lowest cost/lowest quality ones (like this one) will use the component video jacks and a separate audio cables. If you capture the HDMI output, you'll get much better quality but the hardware will be more expensive, although it's still cheaper than the 3 adapters you'd need to string end-to-end with your original idea.

One of these would seem to be a reasonable solution.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at Nov 03. 2018 19:54


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Director Suite 365 | Win10 Pro | Core i7-4770K (o'ck to 4.3GHz) | GTX 780Ti | nVidia 411.70 | ASUS Z87 DX/QUAD | 5.4TB SSDs | 23TB HDDs | 32GB RAM | (12GB RAMDrive)
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lawrenceqsherry [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Oct 28, 2018 21:47 Messages: 3 Offline
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Quote

A USB capture device will connect to your camcorder's video out signal, like it was a TV. It will then convert the analog TV signal to a digital format that's saved on your laptop.

The lowest cost/lowest quality ones (like this one) will use the component video jacks and a separate audio cables. If you capture the HDMI output, you'll get much better quality but the hardware will be more expensive, although it's still cheaper than the 3 adapters you'd need to string end-to-end with your original idea.

One of these would seem to be a reasonable solution.


Thank you. I started looking into HDMI after you wrote to me. It never occured to me that HDMI could provide the digital video and audio I need. I was thinking at it from the prospect of a computer. Thank you.
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