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transfering mini DV tape movies from Firewire 400 to New computer with USB 3.1 and Thunderbolt ports
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lawrenceqsherry [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Oct 28, 2018 21:47 Messages: 4 Offline
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Software I use: Media Suite 10

I have a Canon HV20 camcorder with uses Firewire 400 to transfer movies to a computer (a Dell i7 Gen 8 using Windows 10). My problem is that new laptops like mine do not have the now defunct Firewire ports and new laptops no longer have PC slots for PC cards. I need a way to transfer my tapes to my computer.

My computer has USB 3.1 ports and a Thunderbolt 3 port.

So far the only solution I have found (that was designed designed for use on MACs) is to purchase three separate adapters and daisy chain them together. First I need a Thunderbolt 2 to Firewire 800 adapter. Then I need an adapter that converts Thunderbolt 2 to Thunderbolt 3. Finally I need a firewire 800 to 400 adapter. This will cost $88 and may not work on a Windows Computer (all of the adapters are made by Apple.

Pinnacle used to make a Moviebox which had a firewire input and a USB 2 output but I'm not sure if I would lose video quality.

If anyone knows of a solution I'd appreciate your assistance.

Lawrence Sherry
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optodata
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: California, USA Joined: Sep 16, 2011 16:04 Messages: 3340 Offline
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I assume there are still videos on the device that you'd like to access. If not, I think you'd be much better off by buying any new or used camera from the past couple of years and get the benefits of vastly more detailed video along with fully compatible connectivity. Even a couple hundred dollars would get you 1080/60p, and maybe even 2k/4k.

Otherwise, the two best ways I can see are to buy a simple USB-based video capture module (as low as $25 or so) and use PowerDirector's built-in Capture room to "record" the video from your camera onto your laptop's hard drive.

Another option would be to find a cheap miniDV camcorder with a USB port on Ebay, and plop your media in and make the transfer that way.
youtube/optodata

DS365 | Win10 Pro | 8 Core/16T i9-9900K (4.8GHz) | RTX 2070 | 32GB RAM | 6TB SSDs

Canon Vixia GX10 (4K 60p) | HF G30 (HD 60p) | HF S200 (HD 30p) | Yi Action+ 4K | 360Fly 4K 360°
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lawrenceqsherry [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Oct 28, 2018 21:47 Messages: 4 Offline
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Quote I assume there are still videos on the device that you'd like to access. If not, I think you'd be much better off by buying any new or used camera from the past couple of years and get the benefits of vastly more detailed video along with fully compatible connectivity. Even a couple hundred dollars would get you 1080/60p, and maybe even 2k/4k.

Otherwise, the two best ways I can see are to buy a simple USB-based video capture module (as low as $25 or so) and use PowerDirector's built-in Capture room to "record" the video from your camera onto your laptop's hard drive.

Another option would be to find a cheap miniDV camcorder with a USB port on Ebay, and plop your media in and make the transfer that way.


I want to transfer movies so that I can edit them.

I'm don't understand how a USB video capture module would help unless it had a firewire input. The only device I saw like that was made by Pinnacle (it is now discontinued) and a used one sells for over $200 dollars.



Surprisingly it is very hard to find a recent HD camera that used mini DV tapes and a USB video output. The manufacturing date of my camera is 2010. Firewire 400 was still the way to go then. They even came out with firewire 800. Once you get a little newer you are on to different media than mini DV tapes. Firewire 400 was used because it is faster than USB 2. At that time most computers had USB 2 even though USB 3.0 came out before I bought my camera. Since most computer hardware doesn not require speeds as fast as Firewire (mice, keyboards, etc) It became the popular transfer device, Firewire died.

I'll have to keep looking for a solution that is inexpensive. It's not like it was when I was "filming" my kids, or later their weddings . I no longer need a newer camcorder.

Thank you for trying to help. I really appreciate it.
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optodata
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: California, USA Joined: Sep 16, 2011 16:04 Messages: 3340 Offline
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Quote I want to transfer movies so that I can edit them.

I'm don't understand how a USB video capture module would help unless it had a firewire input. The only device I saw like that was made by Pinnacle (it is now discontinued) and a used one sells for over $200 dollars.

A USB capture device will connect to your camcorder's video out signal, like it was a TV. It will then convert the analog TV signal to a digital format that's saved on your laptop.

The lowest cost/lowest quality ones (like this one) will use the component video jacks and a separate audio cables. If you capture the HDMI output, you'll get much better quality but the hardware will be more expensive, although it's still cheaper than the 3 adapters you'd need to string end-to-end with your original idea.

One of these would seem to be a reasonable solution.

This message was edited 1 time. Last update was at Nov 03. 2018 19:54


youtube/optodata

DS365 | Win10 Pro | 8 Core/16T i9-9900K (4.8GHz) | RTX 2070 | 32GB RAM | 6TB SSDs

Canon Vixia GX10 (4K 60p) | HF G30 (HD 60p) | HF S200 (HD 30p) | Yi Action+ 4K | 360Fly 4K 360°
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lawrenceqsherry [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Oct 28, 2018 21:47 Messages: 4 Offline
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Quote

A USB capture device will connect to your camcorder's video out signal, like it was a TV. It will then convert the analog TV signal to a digital format that's saved on your laptop.

The lowest cost/lowest quality ones (like this one) will use the component video jacks and a separate audio cables. If you capture the HDMI output, you'll get much better quality but the hardware will be more expensive, although it's still cheaper than the 3 adapters you'd need to string end-to-end with your original idea.

One of these would seem to be a reasonable solution.


Thank you. I started looking into HDMI after you wrote to me. It never occured to me that HDMI could provide the digital video and audio I need. I was thinking at it from the prospect of a computer. Thank you.
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Herojay [Avatar]
Newbie Private Message Joined: Dec 23, 2018 19:10 Messages: 4 Offline
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Quote

A USB capture device will connect to your camcorder's video out signal, like it was a TV. It will then convert the analog TV signal to a digital format that's saved on your laptop.

The lowest cost/lowest quality ones (like this one) will use the component video jacks and a separate audio cables. If you capture the HDMI output, you'll get much better quality but the hardware will be more expensive, although it's still cheaper than the 3 adapters you'd need to string end-to-end with your original idea.

One of these would seem to be a reasonable solution.

Hello - my issue is similar except my dvd’s In good condition and have connectivity issue. I purchased a rca-to-hdmi converter and connected to my GPU but when I try to capture my video the PD17 icon for DVcamera is grayed out. Also I found in the pd17 manual you have to capture using a usb input to the PC. Seems quite odd if this is true.
But seeking solutions and will do what I need to do if you will assist me.

  1. trying to capture from my video8 camera with rca output to the rca-hdmi converter. Note if I connect my dvr directly to my monitor with hdmi I can watch my video directly so I know my new converter from amazon is operational.

  2. Launch PD17 but cannot find where I configure any type of GPU input or why the camera video output is not recognized and the capture icon is grayed out. Bottom line, cannot download my video into PD17.



Separate but but one step at a time is I also have a Panasonic mini dv with only a s-conn and ieee1394 output. Am looking at s-conn or ieee to hdmi adaptor on Amazon but before I buy want to ensure I don’t need a usb converter as described in manual. Will solve problem above first.

My PC:
I9-9700
RTX 2080tI
32 GB RAM
500GB 970 SSD
4 TB internal HD


  1. Sony VCR Hi8

  2. Panasonic mini DV



PD17 just purchased.
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tomasc [Avatar]
Senior Contributor Private Message Joined: Aug 25, 2011 12:33 Messages: 4340 Offline
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I saw your pm. The rca to hdmi converter is output only. The pc does not have a hdmi input. Some laptops have a hdmi output port. They don’t make hdmi ports that are both in/out like usb. The Nvidia graphics card ports are hdmi out only not in.

The $10 solution mentioned by optodata above should work well for what you want to do for both Hi8 and miniDV.
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optodata
Senior Contributor Private Message Location: California, USA Joined: Sep 16, 2011 16:04 Messages: 3340 Offline
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Quote
  • trying to capture from my video8 camera with rca output to the rca-hdmi converter. Note if I connect my dvr directly to my monitor with hdmi I can watch my video directly so I know my new converter from amazon is operational.

  • Launch PD17 but cannot find where I configure any type of GPU input or why the camera video output is not recognized and the capture icon is grayed out. Bottom line, cannot download my video into PD17.

  • [/olist]

    Welcome to the forum.

    The RCA-HDMI adapter works on your monitor because your monitor is expecting an HDMI signal to display, meaning that it's HDMI port is an input.

    The HDMI ports on laptops and PCs are all output ports, which mean they supply the HDMI signal for monitors to display, but they do not accept HDMI signals from other devices. The only exception is if you have a port labeled "HDMI IN" and that's not a typical situation.

    The solution is to get the HDMI to USB converter like the one I linked to in an earlier post.

    Your current converter solves the problem of getting the video from your camera to a display device, and the second adapter will convert the HDMI audio and video into a format that your computer and PD can record, so the camera's contents can be captured on your computer.

    For your second issue, if you get a convertor that outputs HDMI, then you'd simply connect that to the new converter you'll be getting for the above camera and you're all set to transfer videos to PD from your Panasonic miniDV camera.

    EDIT: Looks like this time tomasc beat me to the answer AND he said it much more efficiently!

    This message was edited 2 times. Last update was at Dec 24. 2018 11:48


    youtube/optodata

    DS365 | Win10 Pro | 8 Core/16T i9-9900K (4.8GHz) | RTX 2070 | 32GB RAM | 6TB SSDs

    Canon Vixia GX10 (4K 60p) | HF G30 (HD 60p) | HF S200 (HD 30p) | Yi Action+ 4K | 360Fly 4K 360°
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    Herojay [Avatar]
    Newbie Private Message Joined: Dec 23, 2018 19:10 Messages: 4 Offline
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    Quote I saw your pm. The rca to hdmi converter is output only. The pc does not have a hdmi input. Some laptops have a hdmi output port. They don’t make hdmi ports that are both in/out like usb. The Nvidia graphics card ports are hdmi out only not in.

    The $10 solution mentioned by optodata above should work well for what you want to do for both Hi8 and miniDV.

    THANKS SO MUCH!
    Was hoping operator error! I will purchase the device suggested. Hope my next questions are more sophisticated - look forward to learning about video editing!
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    lawrenceqsherry [Avatar]
    Newbie Private Message Joined: Oct 28, 2018 21:47 Messages: 4 Offline
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    Quote

    A USB capture device will connect to your camcorder's video out signal, like it was a TV. It will then convert the analog TV signal to a digital format that's saved on your laptop.

    The lowest cost/lowest quality ones (like this one) will use the component video jacks and a separate audio cables. If you capture the HDMI output, you'll get much better quality but the hardware will be more expensive, although it's still cheaper than the 3 adapters you'd need to string end-to-end with your original idea.

    One of these would seem to be a reasonable solution.


    Thank you for your reply The "expensive" option really isn't that expensive. The only problem I have with the converter is that I can't find any reviews of it. I have to do some more research on it. If Amazon sold it themselves I could always return it if it did not do a good job. But since the sell it through a third party I'm not sure if returns and refunds will be honored.

    Thank you again and have very happy holidays,

    Lawrence Sherry
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    Herojay [Avatar]
    Newbie Private Message Joined: Dec 23, 2018 19:10 Messages: 4 Offline
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    OK
    Quote

    Welcome to the forum.

    The RCA-HDMI adapter works on your monitor because your monitor is expecting an HDMI signal to display, meaning that it's HDMI port is an input.

    The HDMI ports on laptops and PCs are all output ports, which mean they supply the HDMI signal for monitors to display, but they do not accept HDMI signals from other devices. The only exception is if you have a port labeled "HDMI IN" and that's not a typical situation.

    The solution is to get the HDMI to USB converter like the one I linked to in an earlier post.

    Your current converter solves the problem of getting the video from your camera to a display device, and the second adapter will convert the HDMI audio and video into a format that your computer and PD can record, so the camera's contents can be captured on your computer.

    For your second issue, if you get a convertor that outputs HDMI, then you'd simply connect that to the new converter you'll be getting for the above camera and you're all set to transfer videos to PD from your Panasonic miniDV camera.

    EDIT: Looks like this time tomasc beat me to the answer AND he said it much more efficiently!

    OK, thanks both.
    For my Panasonic Mini, it has no RCA plugs and has only S-video with separate audio (understand S only carries video and no audio) AND a DV Connector - I read DV has much better video quality than S-Conn and also carries both A/V. If this is true, should I not get a DV to USB cable?
    Next question - I see on Internet these cables are only cables with different connectors (ieee1394 to USB) and no video chip / conversion as I see with the other format cables. Are these cables good? ieee 4-pin to USB? My Panasonic is an palmsight POV-DV910 MINI DV WITH PC INTERFACE IEEE1394. Want to ensure I capture both A/V.

    Thanks

    Jay
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